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Gun Discussion

Background Pony #DFEF
@Background Pony #AA1F  
Zerowinger has the correct information. I would also add, be careful you do not mix up UK military designations for large caliber guns. The Royal Ordnance 105mm L7 gun that was US standard in the M48, M60, and M1 tanks for so many years, and NATO standard too, did not have a gun tube 7 calibers long. The L in that designation is UK military shorthand for “Land Service.” The old rifled 105mm was an L52, in terms of gun barrel length, by the way. It replaced the US 90mm/L53 and UK “20 Pounder” 84mm/L67.
 
Also, 20 calibers or less is usually for short-range indirect-fire weapons, like mortars and howitzers, that operate at relatively low pressures and generate relatively low velocities. Tank guns require high velocities and usually have gun barrels in the 40-60 calibers range, like the NATO 105mm/L52, and the 120mm/L44 that replaced it. Or the Russian 125mm/L48 they and China currently use, replacing the 115mm/L53 and 100mm/L54, which replaced the 85mm/L55 and 76.2mm/L43.
Background Pony #DFEF
Here, have a rant I have posted elsewhere on the Internets.  
—–  
“Stopping power” with handguns is a will-o’-the-wisp. Inflicting injuries so severe that they incapacitate immediately, even with the latest and greatest hollowpoint ammunition, is a spotty proposition at best with handguns and seems to be almost entirely dependent on bullet placement and intangible, unmeasurable psychological factors, like just how badly that guy over there with the machete wants to kill you (also known as “dumb luck”). Even with high-powered rifles, anyone who’s hunted whitetail deer has seen a hundred-and-fifty-pound deer with its heart and both lungs torn to bloody pulp by hydrostatic shock and an exit wound the size of a silver dollar on its far side leap into the air and run a quarter mile before collapsing.
 
As has been noted on other forums, a statistic that hasn’t changed much since the advent of metallic cartridge firearms after the Civil War is that when a police officer in the US draws his sidearm and shoots in defense of his own life or the life of an innocent party, he uses between 2.3 and 2.5 rounds, on average, going up or down a bit from year to year. This despite a century and more of technological innovations that were sold as “game-changers.” Large caliber cartridges that dwarfed the dinky blackpowder .32s that police departments issued all up and down the East Coast in the 1880s came into common law enforcement use nationwide after the First World War. Smokeless powder. Magnum revolvers. High capacity magazines. Hollowpoint bullets. Lights and lasers. New shooting stances and new training methods. And on and on. It’s still 2.3 to 2.5 rounds.
 
But it’s also been noted that when we get away from instantaneous effects, and look at things like viability of surrounding tissue after a gunshot wound, we see clear trends. Wounds from higher velocity cartridges that create greater hydrostatic shock tend to be slower to heal and more prone to post-surgical complications like infection. Revolver cartridges with “Magnum” in the name are particularly known for causing wounds that seem straightforward in the emergency room–but two weeks after the first surgery, the patient is back in the operating room for an amputation because so much tissue around the path of the bullet turned necrotic and gangrenous in the days after surgery. And this seems to be true even when expanding hollowpoint bullets are not used–plain old flat-nosed cast lead bullets of the kind Elmer Keith was playing with a century ago are good enough to do this.
 
In 1946-47, the Army interviewed thousands of military surgeons and physicians and were told again and again that 9mm wounds healed slower than wounds inflicted with .45, that the higher-velocity 9mm was more likely to shatter bone in a way that drove sharp bone splinters deeply into surrounding tissue, resulting in more hemorrhages, more infections, more amputations, and a higher mortality rate in an era before antibiotics were common. But the .45 was kept in service, in part because it was, at the time, well regarded by the troops, who had confidence in it, in part due to the fact that the US military had two years prior purchased two million .45 caliber pistols and a million and a half .45 caliber submachineguns, and no one was willing to volunteer to tell Congress, in peacetime, that they wanted to scrap it all and start over. See also, Douglas MacArthur and his cancellation of the .276 Pedersen service rifle cartridge in 1932–not because it didn’t perform as advertised, not because it wouldn’t have improved on the old .30/06 in important ways, but because he knew better than to try to hard-sell it to Congress during the Depression when the War Department was still sitting on billions of rounds of surplus .30/06 ammo left over from the First World War, at a time when War Department budgets were so low that Americans were drilling with broomsticks in Basic Training instead of rifles and hanging hand-painted signs that said “TANK” on the sides of trucks.
 
Nonetheless this is one of the reasons NATO selected the 9mm pistol cartridge as standard. Another is that other NATO countries had already adopted the 9mm cartridge and had significant stocks already available. Another is that there were interviews with hundreds of former Wehrmacht enlisted men who’d used the 9mm in combat and were with few exceptions highly satisfied with its performance, especially from submachineguns. But they did not have the unrealistic expectation some Americans do from watching black-and-white Western movies that a proper pistol bullet should pick up the recipient and throw him ten feet through the air, through the glass window of the saloon, out into the street for tidy disposal. But that’s a different topic.
Background Pony #782C
@lonewolf  
The good news: Remington ammo will be available again.
 
The bad news: it’s Remington ammo.
 
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Thunderblots. 😒
ElderD

@Background Pony #5252  
Sometimes Calibre type can matter in context. For example, my dad has a .357 magnum revolver. But he uses a compact .45 for home defence. Because unlike a .45 slug, a .357 is a slim, high velocity round that has a higher likelihood of going right through a human target. Something you don’t want happening in your home. Especially if you aren’t living alone.
 
Yes, my dad and I favor .45 over 9mm.
Ebalosus
Silver Bit -
Sapphire -
Happy Derpy! -
Bronze Supporter -
The End wasn't The End - Found a new home after the great exodus of 2012

Zipp is g5 BP
In two years we’ve gone from Songbirds, Wayfairys, and Derwood’s progenies to this:
 
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What was once a small community of enthusiasts in the US is now a community of tens of thousands worldwide working on bringing guns to the masses, and subsequently destroying gun control.
Dex Stewart
Twinkling Balloon - Took part in the 2021 community collab.
Ten years of changes - Celebrated the 10th anniversary of MLP:FiM!
A Really Classy Artist - 250+ images under their artist tag
An Artist Who Rocks - 100+ images under their artist tag
Artist -

Ecto-Phase,Activate!
Have you ever wanted a gun,but we’re like,“if only it were shaped like a dinosaur eating another dinosaur’s ass…”  
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Here you go.
Background Pony #5252
@ElderD  
Yeah, this is the case when it matters. Though considering American cardboard houses, I’d be afraid to shoot even a .45 inside.
 
@Ebalosus  
Most of them are only lowers, so they only tackle the unusual gun control of the US. The other ones are more useful though.
 
I’m afraid the politicians won’t understand reality for many years to come and will push for more gun control and censorship, thinking it can prevent people from obtaining guns. I can even see them attempting to regulate pipes and drill presses.
 
@Dex Stewart  
I love how the previous post discusses gun control in a serious tone and then you post this thing whose designer was out of control.
Background Pony #AA1F
@Ebalosus
 
Those look… like toy guns in all honestly.  
I have no idea what are those, but somebody didn’t think of children
 
 
@Dex Stewart
 
Because sometimes you need to calculate that danged bullet drop, distance and wind speed with a pistol.
Ebalosus
Silver Bit -
Sapphire -
Happy Derpy! -
Bronze Supporter -
The End wasn't The End - Found a new home after the great exodus of 2012

Zipp is g5 BP
@Background Pony #5252
 
True, but the teal and grey ones at the bottom-centre of the picture don’t use any regulated parts. The teal one, an FGC-9 has an ECM-rifled barrel and the bolt is just two metal rods JB-welded together.
 
The 3DP gun community is very cognisant of increased gun control, so is moving away from unregulated gun parts in the American legal sense, and towards guns that can be built anywhere, alongside the ammo they run.
 
@Goku Black
 
That’s because it’s quite a basic-build suppressor. Standard-sized ‘can’ suppressors have also been developed and successfully tested.
 
@Background Pony #AA1F
 
It’s one of the advantages of 3D-printing: customisability, and not just in colours either.
Background Pony #AA1F
@Ebalosus
 
Now we just need to see a homemade tank gun that looks like it’s built with legos.
 
You seem pretty experienced on that, are you a 3D Gun Printer?
Background Pony #49A2
I just had a Ruger 10/22 takedown model out at the range, and had lots of extraction problems with ammunition that runs reliably in my other guns. I disassembled the bolt and found the lower corner of the extractor hook badly worn, and also burrs on the extractor’s edges. Ruger punches the extractors out of soft sheet metal and it is a testament to the design that they work as well as they do, but maybe a hardened tool steel extractor would be more reliable.
 
I should probably replace it with a tool steel extractor. I don’t have any spares at the moment, so I stoned off the burrs, polished its sides, polished its base where it rubs against the extractor spring plunger, the outside forward side of the extractor hook that slides across the case rims. I also polished the front of the extractor spring plunger and cleaned the extractor slot, then applied a bit of light oil before reassembling. Now the extractor pivots in its slot more freely, but I won’t know if it’s fixed until the next time I have a chance to get to the range.
 
I also was using BX25 magazines, which sometimes, apparently, have problems with some ammunition types nose-diving into the feed ramp built into the metal feed lips at the top. One of them did this several times, so when I got home I disassembled it, cleaned it, put a shortened fired case on the spring axle on the side of the follower to act as a spacer and hold it straight, and polished the inside of the metal feed lips and the feed ramp. Now the top cartridge sticks up at the proper angle, so maybe it’s fixed. I also did a 45 degree chamfer on the the edge around the chamber about twenty thousandths of an inch all the way around and polished that too, just in case a cartridge feeds a bit off center one day.
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